Hi! I noticed the tips of my betta's fins starting to fray today, so I did a hardcore water change and fixed his filter to a lower setting (he couldn't swim away from it before) and he seems to be alright now, but moving around a little less than usual. Should I be worried?
Anonymous

It’s hard to tell! We could give you a more accurate answer if you submit a picture (:

It could be a couple of different things, the most common being; tail biting, tearing on decor/getting caught in filter intake, or fin rot.

If it’s the first, try rearranging the tank once in a while to keep him entertained, or playing with a laser pointer or mirror.

If it’s the second, make sure you have no plastic plants, and make sure any decorations have been sanded down enough that they’d pass the ‘pantyhose test’ (aka you could stick them in pantyhose without it tearing). If you have a HOB filter you should have a sponge over the intake tube so that he doesn’t get the edge of his fins sucked into it.

For fin rot, this is often caused by problems in the water. Do you know your current parameters? Ammonia/nitrite/nitrate? What’s the temperature at? Clean water is usually the best cure for fin rot, and API’s Stress Coat is a great addition to helping him heal.

But like I said, hard to give you any real answers withut a picture or knowing more about your tank (:

kai-ni:

This is why it is vitally important that 80%-100% water changes be done DAILY during tank cycling. 
(What is tank cycling? The most important aspect of keeping fish! Have a look here)
These readings are before water change -> after water change. (and the reading is .25 after, not 0)
As you guys know, I just moved. And in moving my tanks, their cycles had to re-establish. Two of my three tanks are already back on track, but this tank had JUST re-established before I moved so it was more fragile and the nitrite eating bacteria died off.
I have been doing 75% water changes every 12 hours and STILL the nitrite climbs to serious levels in that time. (I also dose prime in the tank so don’t worry about the babs).
That high reading? Is again, just 12 hours after the last change. I’m livid because I seem to have completely lost my nitrite-eating bacteria.
(I’ve now put some seeding material from one of the established tanks in, so it should get better soon).
But the point is, if you are forced into doing fish-in cycling by circumstance (bought the fish in ignorance, or rescued it) daily water changes are 100% necessary. Don’t miss even one.
And this is also why you should never just USE live fish to cycle a tank - imagine NEVER doing water changes, through this? Torturous.

kai-ni:

This is why it is vitally important that 80%-100% water changes be done DAILY during tank cycling.

(What is tank cycling? The most important aspect of keeping fish! Have a look here)

These readings are before water change -> after water change. (and the reading is .25 after, not 0)

As you guys know, I just moved. And in moving my tanks, their cycles had to re-establish. Two of my three tanks are already back on track, but this tank had JUST re-established before I moved so it was more fragile and the nitrite eating bacteria died off.

I have been doing 75% water changes every 12 hours and STILL the nitrite climbs to serious levels in that time. (I also dose prime in the tank so don’t worry about the babs).

That high reading? Is again, just 12 hours after the last change. I’m livid because I seem to have completely lost my nitrite-eating bacteria.

(I’ve now put some seeding material from one of the established tanks in, so it should get better soon).

But the point is, if you are forced into doing fish-in cycling by circumstance (bought the fish in ignorance, or rescued it) daily water changes are 100% necessary. Don’t miss even one.

And this is also why you should never just USE live fish to cycle a tank - imagine NEVER doing water changes, through this? Torturous.

sbuzzard:

A sketch of my recently departed crowntail betta, Fernando, who I’ve had for 2.5 years. His passing was quite emotional for me, so I wanted to make a commemorative painting to hang in my studio where his tank is.

sbuzzard:

A sketch of my recently departed crowntail betta, Fernando, who I’ve had for 2.5 years. His passing was quite emotional for me, so I wanted to make a commemorative painting to hang in my studio where his tank is.

"my ten gallon takes 5 seconds to clean" HOW?!?!?!? I know you're exaggerating, but my 5 gal takes forever. When I had two tanks it could take an hour.
Anonymous

bettablogging:

carrionaway:

bettablogging:

That was Inac who said that but I have a 5 and a 10 too and they are really easy to clean?? I guess we’d have to ask exactly what you mean by ‘clean’ because we aren’t talking about a big tear down deep clean but your weekly maintenance.

For me my frequent care takes little to no time. Daily feedings, testing every other day, and two small water changes a week. It takes a while to get into a routine, but once you get into the swing of things it goes by really quickly.

Yup! Change some water, vacuum some waste- takes no time at all in a small tank once you’re practiced!

(Self-reblog for Inac reply)

Yes, it usually only takes me 10-15 minutes to do weekly tank maintenance on my ten. 30-45 minutes for my 20 and 30, lol.

"my ten gallon takes 5 seconds to clean" HOW?!?!?!? I know you're exaggerating, but my 5 gal takes forever. When I had two tanks it could take an hour.
Anonymous

carrionaway:

bettablogging:

That was Inac who said that but I have a 5 and a 10 too and they are really easy to clean?? I guess we’d have to ask exactly what you mean by ‘clean’ because we aren’t talking about a big tear down deep clean but your weekly maintenance.

For me my frequent care takes little to no time. Daily feedings, testing every other day, and two small water changes a week. It takes a while to get into a routine, but once you get into the swing of things it goes by really quickly.

Yup! Change some water, vacuum some waste- takes no time at all in a small tank once you’re practiced!

"my ten gallon takes 5 seconds to clean" HOW?!?!?!? I know you're exaggerating, but my 5 gal takes forever. When I had two tanks it could take an hour.
Anonymous

That was Inac who said that but I have a 5 and a 10 too and they are really easy to clean?? I guess we’d have to ask exactly what you mean by ‘clean’ because we aren’t talking about a big tear down deep clean but your weekly maintenance.

Hi! My betta's scales are raised. No swelling or anything else. Just that he's got his scare raised. That's it. What could be wrong with him?
Anonymous

It’s hard to say without pictures but from first description it sounds like dropsy, which is  not so much an illness as a symptom of an illness. Dropsy, or “pineconing” is the visible result of organ failure in a fish, which could be caused by a number of different illnesses and infections. It is, unfortunately, nearly always fatal, simply because by the time you catch it, things have already progressed too far. However! It’s not completely hopeless, and it might not even BE dropsy (you can submit pictures to us always!)

Giving us a little more information can be helpful too (temperature and size of the tank, your current ammonia/nitrate/nitrite readings, what do you feed, etcetc).

Common Misconceptions About Keeping Aquariums

scalestails:

People have been keeping fish for hundreds of years, but only within the past 50 years or so have they become so common. It is also during this time that many misconceptions have come to the surface. Most of the time these originated because of a lack of knowledge, but as we experimented and technology got better, we got a better understanding of fish. But this initial information (or sometimes intentional misinformation) is still around, and the vast majority of people who keep fish think at least one of these things is true.

Read More

A very good article!

I disagree only on the issue of a bigger tank at first. Chiefly because the OP is entirely correct, larger tanks are easier in pretty much every regard. However, they are also more expensive.

Again, can’t afford the pet, don’t get the pet, but I think there is something to be said for starting small. This is in terms of financial and time costs. Frankly, as the owner of three tanks, my ten gallon takes 5 seconds to clean. As someone with chronic back problems? I prefer hauling 2.5 gallons of water or so once than multiple buckets of 2.5-5 gallons.

It also has cost me the least even as it is now on par with my other tanks in terms of lighting and costs on more expensive things, luxury things (just ordered a new light woo). Sometimes, you may really want to get into a hobby, but quickly find that you’re not cut out for it. Fishkeeping takes a lot of dedication: space, money, time, patience. It’s easy to look at things and say you think you can do this.

Then you figure out: Oh no! I can’t! So I like saying a 5.5-10 gallon for start up due to those reasons. It minimizes the money, time, and space aspect. It increases the patience/stress aspect, but as you said, ten gallons are a one species tank. Some of that is gone with only caring for one species, instead of the multiple kept in a larger tank.

Just my thoughts, but obviously it is a topic with multiple valid opinions.

-Mod Inac

I'm wondering if I need a heater for my betta tank. I live in Hawaii, where due to the weather, the water in fishtanks doesn't drop below 80 degrees. I'm not sure whether or not to get a heater
Anonymous

You might not necessarily need a heater, but you’ll have to closely monitor the temperatures. Swings in temperature are almost as dangerous as cold water. I would possibly suggest setting up a tank of water now (if you don’t already have one) and just monitoring the temperature fluctuation for a while. You may not need a heater but you possibly may have to consider cooling options instead depending on what kind of results you get.